the living home

KRISTINA WINGEIER : Reflecting Your Inner Wisdom (part 3 of 3) Cultivating Intuition

Moon 9 // New Moon in Aries

Every one of us is intuitive. Intuition is a normal and natural part of being a human - we are hardwired to receive information from Spirit and the unseen realms. While it is true that some folks are born with a stronger intuitive aptitude than others, everyone has the ability to strengthen their intuitive capacities if they choose.

If the idea that you are intuitive is new territory for you it is important to remember that it takes time to build any skill; cultivating your intuition is no different. The key to building a relationship with this part of yourself is twofold. First, you must be OPEN to the idea that you are intuitive. Once you are open, you need to begin to TRUST any information you receive from your intuitive self. 

If you have not been in a relationship of trust with your inner knowing, your intuition might be speaking in a small, quiet voice. Once you are open to the idea that you are indeed intuitive and you are ready to begin trusting the information you are receiving, the next step is to make a commitment to creating a stronger relationship with your intuition. 

There are many schools and programs for intuitive studies. What I’m offering here are a few tips - simple things that you can do to begin opening and deepening your connection to Spirit in the form of your intuition. 

1. Begin by relaxing and releasing expectations as much as possible. Stress and anxiety will not lead to clarity. Do yourself a favor and enter into this exploration of your intuitive abilities with a playful attitude and a light heart.

2. Quiet your mind chatter on a regular basis. This is crucial, you MUST take the time and space to get quiet and begin to listen to that voice within. For some folks sitting in meditation works. For others, movement is what helps. Know what works for you and engage in this activity on a daily basis.

3. Ask for guidance from Spirit. You can imagine this guidance in whatever way works for you: from a divine being, angels, teachers, ancestors… or simply, the universe. When you have questions that you would like to receive guidance about - ask for a sign from your “support team” and trust that you will know the sign when you see it. Note - sometimes intuitive guidance doesn’t make rational and logical sense in the moment. You must be willing to go by what feels right rather than what looks right on paper.

4. Write down all the instances where you've recognized your intuition's guidance, no matter how seemingly insignificant. Note the outcomes of the situations as well - intuitive information is often made clear in hindsight. Tracking your asks and your answers will help you to validate the existence of your intuition. It will also help you to see how you perceive intuitive information, which channels flow easily for you. For instance, do you feel your intuition in your body? Do you see visions in your mind’s eye? Do you hear guidance in your inner ear? Do you just “know” things? Take notes about this as well.

5. Finally, give thanks - to your guides, to yourself, to the universe - for any and all intuitive guidance you receive. Appreciation only amplifies your connection to Spirit and to your intuition. 

Next month:
Moon 10 | New Moon in Taurus
Connecting with Spirit in Nature {part 1 of 3}
Plant Spirits


Kristina Wingeier is a Lunar Mystic & Soul Counselor offering services for women who are ready to {re}connect with their Inner Wisdom.

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DARCEY BLUE :: BEE BALM BLESSINGS in WINTER

THE MEDICINE JOURNEYS: NOURISHMENT AND RITUALS FROM THE PLANTS

Last July, in the warmth and abundance of summer’s glow, I was excitedly gathering and preserving all the Bee Balm I could get my little hands on.  It was overflowing in every drainage of my Northern Arizona forest home.  Its magenta firework flower heads waving gently in the wind, mingling with the white beauty of yarrow, and deep purple spikes of vervain.  They were taller and fatter than any I had ever seen in my 13 years of herbal wandering and medicine making.   For years, oh how I would pray and scour the land hoping to find a stand that was big enough to harvest a few handfuls of the blossoms.  But it was just at the edge of its range, not getting quite enough water to be abundant, it was, in pockets, but as drought wore on, I did see them growing smaller and fewer in Southern Arizona mountain lands.  

 

But it is a hardly mint family perennial, which does happen to transplant fairly well, and I was able to start a little patch in my garden.  But here, on the Colorado plateau, conditions are ideal for my friend bee balm.  And I was swimming in an abundance of it, with so much gratitude.  Because along with winter soups and hot steamy rooty herbal brews, bee balm is one of my go to winter allies, and oh- it is winter now! The freezing temperatures have taken all my herbs in the garden to sleep, and the land is covered over in snow, all I can pick these days is pinon and juniper (which do make nice brews themselves and are quite medicinal and wonderful in winter too!)  But the blessing of summer, is the abundance of winter stores....especially from my sweet and spicy friend Bee Balm.  Also known as Monarda, and sometimes goes by bergamot, oregano de la sierra, or sweet leaf, it is monarda fistulosa var. menthaefolia to which I am offering this ode.  There are many varieties of monarda, red flowered m. didyma grows in many gardens across the country, and there are countless other wild and spicy spp varying by region.

 

Just like its favored name in this region, oregano de la sierra, (mountain oregano), it has a delightful and strong oregano taste, aroma and spice.  And it is so lovely included in winter soups, stews, meat rubs, and sauces.  It is even delicious as a piquant and intense pesto when made in summer fresh, and frozen for later months.  But in addition to its yumminess as a wild spice and food, its medicinal value is unparalleled.   I could pare down my apothecary to just 10-15 herbs, and this is one I would NOT forgo.

 

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Bee Balm flower infused honey is a winter dream stirred into hot tea or water, soothing a sore throat, easing a cough or combating winter infections  I always make sure to have a jar of bee balm honey made from the bright pink flowers, and besides, who can resist something so beautiful?  You can make bee balm vinegar which is medicinal and tasty to sprinkle on beans and rice as well, leaving the beautiful flowers in the jar, or to use in salad dressings.


I also tincture up loads of the fresh leaves and flowers for an infection kicker outer.  Seriously, I haven’t ever seen this stuff not make a huge difference in varying forms of bacterial infections- be it a sinus infection, stomach flu, UTI, strep throat, and even vaginal yeast infections.  Much like the oregano oil sold in stores, it has many similar compounds and aromatic oils, but in a form that is far more tolerable to the body, and just as effective without burning your mucous membranes.  Typically if I’m working on treating infections at home, I take my herbal allies of choice hourly, or at the least every two.  Frequency is key here.  And i have noted over and over that infections treated effectively at home with herbs dramatically improve within 24-36 hrs, and fully resolve in about 4-5 days.  If that is not the case, then I tend to err on the side of caution and get medical assistance.  Especially if you are working with a client, friend or child.  Sometimes switching up the herbs or adding others to the protocol helps too.  For bee balm, 1 dropper hourly usually does the trick, and I often blend it with other helpers, like Alder, Usnea, Yarrow or Oregon Grape Root, or even with Elderberries if I’m dealing with a viral cold or flu.


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Bee Balm leaf and flower tea is just as effective at kicking the infectious bugaboos out, but the taste is quite strong and for many people unpalatable to intolerable, it is both spicy, hot, and medicinal tasting in tea blends.  Mixing it with lots of peppermint can take the edge off, but go slow with this form if you want to get your friends and family to love and use bee balm.  I generally include it in a warming, stimulating, sweat inducing diaphoretic tea blend at the first sign of a cold, sniffle, cough or flu.  Also when dealing with UTI or gut infections more fluids are effective.

1 pt  bee balm

1 pt yarrow

1 pt elderflower

3 pt peppermint

Steep 10 min and sip as hot as possible. Add honey if desired.


Raising the body temperature and supporting a healthy fever response is an effective way to treat winter illnesses.  Most bacterial and viral infections cannot continue to live and reproduce at temperatures higher than 99℉ in the body.  A fever is a sign the body is doing its job to combat the infection, not a sign that things are getting worse.  Granted, a fever that gets too hot can be uncomfortable (though the dangers may be overstated, check this out from Seattle Childrens Hospital), and using gentle diaphoretic herbs can help to open the pores and break the fever, bringing the temperature down just enough.  Gargling with the luke warm tea or even the tincture mixed in warm saline is a wonderful sore throat remedy, the whole plant is high in tissue numbing essential oils, similar to cloves.  I do also use the tea or tincture as a skin wash or compress for infections, boils, or fungus like athletes foot, ringworm, etc.  Also, used as a sinus steam, dried leaves crumbled into hot water, and inhaled, is an effective way to treat sinus woes, while taking tincture internally as well.


That all said, it’s one of those herbs you can just keep around, and put it in your food, and give yourself a sinus steam with, or add a muslin bag full in your bath, or just drizzle infused honey in your tea every day.  It’s safe, it’s rather yummy, and one of those plant friends you just want to play with every day or so during the cold season. It is a very heating herb, so folks who tend to get overheated or run hot may want to use it in moderation on a day to day basis.


 Every time I look at those beautiful honey blossoms or sprinkle the fragrant leaves in my soup, I remember the glow and abundance of summer, and it warms my spirit and my body.  And I’ve turned to it so often in my herbal practice and day to day living experiences with infections, and I’ve seen it do amazing work, reliably.  And if it is not a plant that grows near where you live, it is easy to grow in a garden space, and can take quite a bit of heat and drought and still be potent and will grow back each winter from the spreading roots.  Noting, that as a mint family plant, it does tend to spread, so give it a nice roomy patch to grow, and you’ll have medicine to last for years to come!


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Shamana Flora

Sacred Wildness ~  Earth Medicine ~ Sacred Life Ways ~ Herbal Apothecary ~ Retreats

Handcrafted Herbal Remedies from Shamana Flora Apothecary

 

 

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THE SACRED BLUEPRINT {part 2 of 3} :: THE WHEEL OF THE YEAR

Welcome to Moon 5: New Moon in Sagittarius. 

Today we are continuing our exploration of The Sacred Blueprint, a trinity of cyclical time measurements that give structure to our days, months and years. The rhythms of the earth and the rhythms of our bodies are deeply aligned - this is the original imprint of how we experience the passing of time.

 

It is very easy to lose track of these natural cycles in the thick fog of techno soup we live in. When you begin tracking the Sacred Blueprint with conscious intention, you are returning to a template of wholeness that was always there to begin with. 

{For MOONRISE|13 sisters, aligning with the Sacred Blueprint will give you a living and breathing framework to help you bring your lunar intentions and solar projections deeper into your bones, weaving cyclical time into the very fabric of your being}

 

The Wheel of the Year and the Four Seasons

 

“Never does nature say one thing and wisdom another.” Juvenal

 

Unless you live near the equator, you will experience shifts and changes in climate and light throughout the course of a calendar year due to the trajectory of earth’s movement around the sun. We label these shifts the four Seasons: Autumn, Winter, Spring and Summer. This demarcation leads us to believe that they are distinct from one another, and while it is true that the Solstices & Equinoxes mark the “official” beginnings and endings to a season, you’ll begin to notice that the seasons tend to overlap. Meaning, Winter will often arrive before the actual Winter Solstice. And Spring will come early some years. There is a lot of fluidity because Mother Nature, while quite ordered, is also free to change things up at her whim.

 

I’m sharing from the lens of my geographical experience, which is in the Northern Hemisphere - the SF bay area in California to be exact. Wherever you live will determine how the seasons manifest for you. If you are in the Southern Hemisphere you will be on the opposite end of the spectrum from the Northern Hemisphere - our spring/summer is your autumn/winter, etc.

 

I’m not a gardener, but I am a plant person. As I observe the life cycles of different plants in my yard and neighborhood, I am witnessing the rhythms of transformation over and over: beginning, blooming, ending and beginning again. The plants remind me that the only constant is change, and that attachment to any one state will lead to stagnation. This is a simple yet profound spiritual truth. Like the plants, the seasons offer me a model that mirrors my own process of internal and external growth, release and change.

 

The Wheel of the Year

The Wheel of the Year is a earth-based spirituality tradition celebrating the cycles of the earth/sun dance throughout a calendar year. On the Wheel of the Year, eight major seasonal holidays are celebrated: Winter & Summer Solstice, Spring & Autumn Equinox and four “cross-quarter” holidays which fall between the Solstices and Equinoxes. The exact dates of Solstices and Equinoxes may vary a bit from year to year; they generally fall somewhere between the 20th and the 23rd of the calendar month.

 

I use these earth/sun based holy days like points on a compass. For me, the seasons aren’t really about the climate, but the quality and amount of light that is ever changing - retreating, returning and retreating again. I contemplate and celebrate the themes of the season with simple gestures: lighting candles; gathering flowers, seed pods, pinecones and other treasures from the natural world to bring inside and put on my altars; eating local and seasonal foods from the farmer’s market. My energy levels, sleep patterns and food cravings tend to shift with the seasons as well.

 

Connecting with the flow of the Sacred Blueprint is an ancient dance. It is old, but not outworn. It is a remembrance. Whether or not you celebrate the earth based holy days, you can easily notice and acknowledge the way the light changes throughout the solar year. You can observe your own energetic flows rising and falling throughout both the lunar month and the solar year.

 

Taking it a step further, you can begin to create self-care practices that are tailored to your constitution and the elemental energies of whatever season you are in. For instance, I find myself engaging in the practice of warm oil massage more often in the autumn and winter. I tend to be cold and dry during these times, and so replenishing in my body what is lacking from my environment becomes a priority.

 

The Wheel of the Year and Psycho-Spiritual Development

 

When viewing the Wheel of the Year through the lens of psycho-spiritual development, we honor the connection between the seasons in nature and the corresponding seasons of our life, both literally and metaphorically. We’ll explore this concept deeper next Moon with the Medicine Wheel and the Four Directions. Until then, I’m sending you Solstice blessings as we celebrate the return of the light.

 

The Flow

  • Winter Solstice/Yule: December 20-23
  • Imbolc/Candlemas: February 1/2
  • Spring Equinox/Eostar: March 20-23
  • Beltane/Mayday: April 30/May 1
  • Summer Solstice/Lithia:June 20-23
  • Lammas/Lughnasad: July 31/August 1
  • Fall Equinox/Mabon: September 20-23
  • Halloween/Samhain: October 31/November 1

 

The Wheel of the Year aligns beautifully with the Lunar Cycle 

 

  • New Moon = Winter Solstice/Yule
  • Crescent Moon = Imbolc/Candlemas
  • First Quarter Moon = Spring Equinox/Ostara
  • Gibbous Moon = Beltane/MayDay
  • Full Moon = Summer Solstice/Litha
  • Disseminating Moon = Lammas/Lughnasadh
  • Last Quarter Moon = Fall Equinox/Mabon
  • Balsamic Moon = Halloween/Samhain

 

Coming next month:

Moon 6 | New Moon in Capricorn

The Sacred Blueprint{part three of three}
The Medicine Wheel and the Four Directions


Kristina Wingeier is a Lunar Mystic, Soul Counselor, and Intuitive Healer. Her services include: Soul Counsel Depth CoachingIntuitive Tarot Readings, and The Conscious Empath Sessions: Re-Patterning Energetic BoundariesHer e-course, The Conscious Empath // Foundation Sessions begins with the New Moon in Aquarius, 2/8/16. Find out more information and/or sign up HERE.

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{THE LIVING HOME} VIGNETTE :: AN A-FRAME ON THE ROCKS. SPINNING CRYSTAL. SOUP.

Leaving our deck for the bears, it's all quartz & spirals. And soup, in bread bowls.

Crushing chopped garlic, leeks & scallions against hot butter. Topping with a pound of parsnip & potato. Simmering with a couple cubes of organic boullion + a shot of cream.

  images :: tumblr

images :: tumblr

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{THE LIVING HOME} VIGNETTE :: FUZZY. FALLISH. TOFFEE.

  image :: tumblr

image :: tumblr

  image :: icliving.com

image :: icliving.com

 image + recipe @ ladyandpups.com

image + recipe @ ladyandpups.com

Make home in a day of contrasts. Seek a bit of the wet & mauve-isn underworld. Leave an offering of sweet nothings whispered to dropping leaves. Stack an indoor hammock with woolen throws. Deep dive into the New Moon in Scorpio feelings armed with pancakes + toffee

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INSIDE #BRIGHTLIVELIHOOD :: RAISING SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURS, CHANGEMAKERS & ACTIVISTS

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Obviously the current global economy is a reflection of board rooms without mothers & children: a kind of vacant leadership that's left their beloveds in search of their fortune. And now there is such movement around "The New Economy." I've long rejected this phrase, which is mostly useful for it's ability to point us away from the crises, & towards better language & wide awake ways - and there are so, so many. 

I adore the language, & pretty much everything, actually, about the Evolving & Emerging Economies Jam. There are so many ancient, exquisite & sustainable forms of exchange evolving (like sisterly potlucks where someone gets $1k, for interest-free, trust-based loans, & local-business bartering), along with new, emergent technologies that do a few, simple, but mind boggling things, like dematerializing (think instagram: no film. no cameras. no paper. it's just an app!), demonetizing (think of the original facebook: it was free in all the ways), & democratizing (think uber: nearly anyone can become a driver & suddenly have a business. or air bnb: have room? have rental). We have every extreme of possible solutions, so it's an exciting time. At Jams, we create mini, week-long versions of the world we want to live in, by joining in small groups with diverse concerns & leadership, to unpack our life + work, & create deep, lasting relationships. Many of my closest friends & long-time collaborators were seeded in this expansive circle, 65 countries-deep. 

Inline with right practice, we bring our mothers & children to the board room table. Or rather, we meet outside. At the river, on the deck, under the trees, and at the food table. We bring our retreat into living economy conferences like BALLE & Bioneers. We learn from & present to the larger community. The mothers & fathers (alongside our brothers & sisters) work, often with the important tools of voice, strings + percussion. And the children are close. Isn't that delicious? Yes. Economy-building informed by the real needs of  many generations. Because we are all accountable to each other.

So...on raising wee world stewards, baby bioneers, & future founders:

I think the formula's pretty simple. Give them nature. Give them community. Then stand back & watch how they do it.  

 first business: they take off. "slow down! come back? goodbye, guys."

first business: they take off. "slow down! come back? goodbye, guys."

 they made nests of fallen lichen + love as offerings

they made nests of fallen lichen + love as offerings

 they inspected rock bottoms for snail & frog eggs...

they inspected rock bottoms for snail & frog eggs...

...and debated the ethics of bringing them home...

 they explored lifecycles, & the needs of each species. they captured & shot wildlife - with their cameras. 

they explored lifecycles, & the needs of each species. they captured & shot wildlife - with their cameras. 

 they played with shadow, made rock cairns, gathered & sniffed bouquets of pennyroyal, + other luscious bankweeds.

they played with shadow, made rock cairns, gathered & sniffed bouquets of pennyroyal, + other luscious bankweeds.

 they found tools. and began planning in itty bitty community.

they found tools. and began planning in itty bitty community.

 they reminded me that nature is first nature, & walked right into all of it.

they reminded me that nature is first nature, & walked right into all of it.

 they took over the tea bar & savored every second of break time.

they took over the tea bar & savored every second of break time.

 they dipped their toes into a thriving ecology. 

they dipped their toes into a thriving ecology. 

 they listened to the mysterious rush, then roar, as a doe & buck made their way down the cliff.

they listened to the mysterious rush, then roar, as a doe & buck made their way down the cliff.

 they dipped nets to catch fish, which, in my mind, is a birthright, right?

they dipped nets to catch fish, which, in my mind, is a birthright, right?

 they owned the path. because we were all born On Purpose.

they owned the path. because we were all born On Purpose.

 they shared living discoveries

they shared living discoveries

 they did some things they weren't really "supposed" to do. and celebrated it.

they did some things they weren't really "supposed" to do. and celebrated it.

 they formed, & then stormed, as humans like to do.

they formed, & then stormed, as humans like to do.

 and together, they made home.

and together, they made home.

Sure, there's no guarantees. Entrepreneurs, for certain, have  specific DNA that loves risks & rewards. But, the new leadership isn't given by individual rewards & personal drive. We are remembering how to be together, & to build initiatives where the most important product is the well-being of the community landscape. Give them a dedicated gathering, & they definitely show up. I know for myself that I am changed.

Watch this space, as I bring you stories of the Jamily, & other examples of {b}right livelihood. 

Inspired by the ones that still act like themselves. 

Loki, Mari, Siddhi, Bodhi, Kingston, Nia, Mekhi, Ani & Lake. Sigh. You guys. Are just so awesome.

And dedicated to the mamas that trusted me to stay close. Thank you, Nika, Chinyere & Ruth! I just love them. 

xx, Maya


Maya Hackett  

Curious. Grateful. Delighted. Pollinator.
  Moves towards life, beauty, magic. Head on Earth, listening for what's needed. Transforms, sharing your light offline, at impossible speeds. Home birthing, urban*steading, unschooled mom of four. Fashion stylist, publisher. Fundraiser, multi-founder. Legacy Architect. Sleeps in the sea, for clarity + support. Gratefully collects minute bits of grace, spins it out as community caramel. With blessed help of thousands, On Purpose.

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